• Veterinary Spotlight on Cytopoint

    Itchy pups are commonplace in the animal hospital, and sometimes, finding the right treatment can be frustrating. Because itching has so many different possible causes, your veterinarian is often left using trial and error to find the right itch treatments for your pet. Further, some pet owners aren’t happy with the prospect of giving their dogs medication to deal with itching. Fortunately, a new alternative is available: CYTOPOINT. CYTOPOINT is safe, effective, and fast-working, so your dog feels more comfortable immediately and you get a break from listening to the constant itching and biting.

    What is CYTOPOINT?

    CYTOPOINT is an injectable immunotherapy treatment that mimics the natural immune response in dogs to disrupt the cycle of inflammation and itching that is associated with atopic dermatitis in dogs. Unlike drug treatment, CYTOPOINT is highly targeted so that its impact on broader immune functions is limited, and it is eliminated from the body through normal product degradation pathways. That means that liver and kidneys are not involved in metabolizing CYTOPOINT, as they are with drug treatments for itchiness.

    How quickly does CYTOPOINT work?

    CYTOPOINT begins working within 24 hours of receiving a single injection at the animal hospital in 80% of dogs. The relief lasts for four to eight weeks. During this period of itch relief, damaged skin has time to heal, which can help to make itching less intense in the future. After the CYTOPOINT injection wears off, dogs can get a repeated dose. CYTOPOINT testing has shown it to be safe and effective for long-term use.

    Are there any side effects?

    The side effects associated with CYTOPOINT are minimal. Some animals experienced slight increases in attacks of diarrhea, vomiting, and alopecia, but these incidences resolved without vet treatment. Less than 2% of dogs in trials of CYTOPOINT had any adverse effects.

    To find out if CYTOPOINT could be right for your dog, make an appointment at Chastain Veterinary Medical Group in McKinney today. A veterinarian can make a diagnosis and determine the best plan for treating your pet’s excessive itching. To schedule an appointment at our pet hospital today, call (972) 239-1309 for Preston Road Animal Hospital in Dallas or call (972) 529-5033 for Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in McKinney.

  • The Importance of Fur De-Matting

    When your pet’s fur becomes long, it also becomes prone to tangles and matting. Matts can appear on the outer coat, where they are easy to see, or in the undercoat, where you may not notice them. Regular pet grooming is an important part of preventing matting in your pet.

    De-matting your animal as part of a regular pet grooming schedule will keep your pet comfortable and help to prevent health problems. Matted fur can be extremely painful, and the skin underneath matts can form sores and other irritations. Sometimes, debris becomes tangled in matts and further irritates your pet skin. During grooming, de-matting can be done gently to reduce discomfort for your pet. Brushing your pet regularly between pet grooming appointments will reduce the risk of matts.

    At Chastain Veterinary Medical Group, we are pleased to offer pet grooming in McKinney and Dallas by professional groomers who can remove matts while protecting your pet’s delicate skin. To make an appointment for grooming or to learn about other services we provide at our pet hospitals, call (972) 239-1309 for Preston Road Animal Hospital in Dallas or call (972) 529-5033 for Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in McKinney.

  • How to Care for Your Dog’s Skin

    How to Care for Your Dog’s Skin

    Dogs are prone to skin problems, especially itchy, dry skin. Fortunately, there are things you can do to help ensure your dog’s skin stays as healthy as possible. If you think your dog is having a skin problem, make an appointment with us or your regular veterinarian for a diagnosis and treatment plan. Here is what you need to know about caring for your dog’s skin.

    Recognizing Signs of Skin Problems

    The most common symptom sign of skin problems in dog is pruritus, or itching. Pruritus is the second most common reason that people take their dogs to the veterinarian. You may notice that your dog is itching more than normal and is also chewing, biting, and licking incessantly, which can cause irritation and wounds that are secondary to the cause of the pruritus. In some cases, you may also notice changes to your dog’s coat and flaky skin that looks like dandruff. When you see these symptoms and they persist for more than a few days, see your veterinarian at the animal hospital. It is important for your vet to determine the cause of your dog’s skin problem so that the correct treatment can be applied. Otherwise, we could accidentally exacerbate the problem. For instance, if your dog has oily skin and you treat him or her for dry skin instead, you could make the oily skin worse.

    Treating and Preventing Skin Problems

    If your dog has a skin problem that has been diagnosed by the veterinarian, then follow his or her prescribed treatment, which may include oral and topical medications. You can also reduce or prevent skin problems by making sure your dog is getting plenty of fresh drinking water and considering adding oils and supplements to your dog’s diet. Be sure to check with your veterinarian before giving your dog any new supplement. Dogs with dry skin can benefit from eating mostly wet food. If your dog has allergies that are causing skin problems, making dietary changes and giving baths with just plain water.

    Don’t let chronic skin problems cause discomfort for your dog. Make an appointment with a veterinarian in McKinney at Chastain Veterinary Medical Group for help. To reach our pet hospital, please call (972) 239-1309. For our north Dallas location, please dial (972) 239-1309.

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  • Pet Problems Caused by Ticks

    veterinarian dallas

    Ticks are more than an annoyance for pets and pet parents—they can transmit dangerous diseases to your pet, many of which can also affect humans. Work out a tick prevention plan with your veterinarian to keep your pet as healthy as possible.

    As with humans, Lyme disease is a risk for pets with ticks. Pets with Lyme disease may develop fever, swollen joints, and, in some cases, kidney disease and nervous system disorders. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever can cause significant complications, as can anaplasmosis. Tick paralysis is particularly dangerous for pets; it is caused by a toxin secreted by ticks and can lead to death without emergency vet care.

    Flea, tick, and heartworm prevention are central parts of wellness care at Chastain Veterinary Medical Group. Learn about your options for preventative care during your next appointment at our animal clinic. Call us today at (972) 239-1309 for Preston Road Animal Hospital in north Dallas or (972) 529-5033 for Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in McKinney, to schedule an appointment at our veterinary hospital in Dallas or to ask about our other services, including pet grooming, boarding, and exotic animal care.

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