• Veterinary Spotlight on Cytopoint

    Itchy pups are commonplace in the animal hospital, and sometimes, finding the right treatment can be frustrating. Because itching has so many different possible causes, your veterinarian is often left using trial and error to find the right itch treatments for your pet. Further, some pet owners aren’t happy with the prospect of giving their dogs medication to deal with itching. Fortunately, a new alternative is available: CYTOPOINT. CYTOPOINT is safe, effective, and fast-working, so your dog feels more comfortable immediately and you get a break from listening to the constant itching and biting.

    What is CYTOPOINT?

    CYTOPOINT is an injectable immunotherapy treatment that mimics the natural immune response in dogs to disrupt the cycle of inflammation and itching that is associated with atopic dermatitis in dogs. Unlike drug treatment, CYTOPOINT is highly targeted so that its impact on broader immune functions is limited, and it is eliminated from the body through normal product degradation pathways. That means that liver and kidneys are not involved in metabolizing CYTOPOINT, as they are with drug treatments for itchiness.

    How quickly does CYTOPOINT work?

    CYTOPOINT begins working within 24 hours of receiving a single injection at the animal hospital in 80% of dogs. The relief lasts for four to eight weeks. During this period of itch relief, damaged skin has time to heal, which can help to make itching less intense in the future. After the CYTOPOINT injection wears off, dogs can get a repeated dose. CYTOPOINT testing has shown it to be safe and effective for long-term use.

    Are there any side effects?

    The side effects associated with CYTOPOINT are minimal. Some animals experienced slight increases in attacks of diarrhea, vomiting, and alopecia, but these incidences resolved without vet treatment. Less than 2% of dogs in trials of CYTOPOINT had any adverse effects.

    To find out if CYTOPOINT could be right for your dog, make an appointment at Chastain Veterinary Medical Group in McKinney today. A veterinarian can make a diagnosis and determine the best plan for treating your pet’s excessive itching. To schedule an appointment at our pet hospital today, call (972) 239-1309 for Preston Road Animal Hospital in Dallas or call (972) 529-5033 for Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in McKinney.

  • What to Expect When Your Pet Needs Surgery

    Pet parents never want to think about their beloved animal undergoing surgery, but sometimes it is necessary to treat an illness or injury. At every turn, your veterinarian and the staff at the pet hospital will be available to explain the process for you and address your concerns. If your pet is scheduled for surgery, here is a look at what you can expect.

    Pre-Operative Prep

    Before your pet undergoes his or her procedure, your veterinarian will take every possible precaution before surgery to ensure that your pet is healthy enough for anesthesia and recovery. This will typically include a physical exam, blood work, and ECG screenings. These tests help your veterinarian make the right decisions about the type of anesthesia to use and which medications may be necessary before and after surgery. If the surgery is a planned procedure and not one that is the result of an emergency, be sure to follow all pre-op instructions and to bring your pet in for appointments and screenings as necessary to avoid delays in the surgery. For emergencies, these pre-op tests will be performed immediately before surgery.

    Surgical Procedure

    During surgery, your pet will receive the type of anesthetics that the veterinarian has determined are appropriate for him or her. The procedure itself will, of course, vary depending on the problem that is being treated. Your veterinarian will explain what the procedure will entail and how long you can expect your pet to be in surgery.

    Post-Operative Recovery

    After surgery, your pet will recover in a specialized area of the pet hospital while being closely monitored by veterinary nurses as he or she recovers from the anesthesia. He or she will also receive pain medication as needed. When it’s time for your pet to go home, you’ll receive medication and home care instructions. You may also make a time for a return visit for a checkup.

    Chastain Veterinary Medical Group understands how overwhelming pet surgery can be, and we strive to give every pet family the best possible experience. When your pet needs surgery, schedule a consultation with one of our veterinarians in Dallas or McKinney. Call Preston Road Animal Hospital in north Dallas at (972) 239-1309 or call Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in the McKinney/Frisco area at (972) 529-5033.

  • Examining Common Myths About Dog and Nutrition

    It isn’t just humans who are surrounded with conflicting information about nutrition. There is a lot of information available to dog owners about feeding their pups that can be confusing and misleading. The best way to find out what is really best for your dog is to make an appointment at your animal clinic to talk to your veterinarian about your dog’s specific health needs. Are popular myths about dog nutrition leading you to put your pooch’s health on the line? Here is what you need to know.

    Myth: Dogs have to eat dry food to prevent dental disease.

    Dry food does indeed help to clean debris off your dog’s teeth as he or she crunches, but the overall impact, while real, is probably not large. In reality, some dogs will simply only eat wet food, and that’s OK. It’s more important for your dog to get a dose of balanced nutrition from a healthy wet food than to starve himself or herself by refusing the crunchy food you keep putting out. If you’re concerned about your dog’s teeth, see your veterinarian regularly for pet dental services and try other preventative edibles, such as dental chews and crunchy carrots for snacks.

    Myth: Only whole meat is quality protein for dogs.

    Some dog foods contain whole meat and others contain meat meal. They can both be healthy for your pet. The source of the protein is the most important factor. Meat meal can be a more concentrated and affordable source of protein for dogs and is perfectly safe and healthy. Remember that pet food manufacturers sell and promote ingredients, whereas a dog’s metabolism needs nutrients. Your veterinarian can offer guidance when you’re looking for a pet food that has a healthy source of protein for your dog.

    Myth: Putting garlic on dog food gets rid of worms.

    At best, putting garlic on your dog’s food will have no impact at all. At worst, it can make your dog ill, as garlic can be extremely toxic to pups. To prevent the need for emergency vet care, leave the garlic off your dog’s food entirely.

    Do you have any questions about what you should feed your furry friend? Visit Chastain Veterinary Medical Group and speak with a veterinarian in Dallas or McKinney about your pet’s specific nutritional needs. Call (972) 239-1309 (Dallas) or (972) 529-5033 (McKinney) to make an appointment today.

  • Common Health Issues in Senior Cats

    As your cat gets older, his or her health may change over time, and you may need to make more frequent visits to the veterinarian. Fortunately, many senior cat health problems are manageable and won’t prevent your cat from living a long life, as long as he or she gets the proper care. Here are some of the most common health problems diagnosed in senior cats and how your veterinarian can address them.

    Arthritis

    Arthritis is extremely common in older cats. After the age of 12, approximately 90% of cats begin to show signs of arthritis. While arthritis is no doubt uncomfortable for the cat, it can sometimes be difficult for us humans to pick up on. Pay attention for subtle, telltale symptoms, such as new difficulty going up and down the stairs, a reluctance to jump on and off furniture, and stiffness upon standing. If you notice these symptoms, make an appointment at your animal hospital to explore treatment options. If your cat is overweight, losing some excess weight can also reduce the stress on joints.

    Dental Disease

    Dental disease—especially gum disease—is another common problem in older cats. You can reduce the risk of dental disease with regular pet dental services at the vet and with brushing your cat’s teeth at home. Adding Oxyfresh Pet Oral Hygiene Solution to the pets drinking water has also problem useful in our hands. Dental disease not only causes pain and makes it difficult for your cat to eat, but it can also lead to systemic infections, including heart disease and respiratory problems. If your cat hasn’t had a dental checkup recently, or if you have noticed a change in your cat’s eating habits, make a vet appointment.

    Vision Loss

    As cats age, they become more prone to vision problems such as cataracts, glaucoma, and retinal detachment. In addition to obvious indicators like your cat bumping into things, look for cloudy eyes. Depending on the cause of your cat’s vision loss, your veterinarian may recommend medications or surgery or environmental adjustments. In some cases, cats can adapt to vision loss without the need for extensive treatment.

    From their first year through their senior years, the vets at Chastain Veterinary Medical Group are committed to helping cats live happy and healthy lives. You can make an appointment at our animal hospital in Dallas by calling (972) 239-1309 or for our animal hospital in McKinney, call (972) 529-5033.

  • How to Get Your Dog to Take a Pill

    One experience almost every dog owner has when the veterinarian prescribes medication is the frustrating fight to get your pup to swallow the pill. Dogs can turn into sophisticated tricksters when you have medication to give them, somehow managing to extract the pill from whatever high-value treat you may be offering if they catch even a whiff of the medicine. Your veterinarian is a good source of information if your dog persistently refuses medicine. This advice will also help.

    If your dog is wise to your routine of sticking a pill in his or her regular treat, try putting into something your dog isn’t used to having—the smellier, the better. You can also try giving several treats at once, so your dog gobble them all, not realizing one has medicine. If all else fails, gently insert the pill into your dog’s throat and follow it up another treat or syringe of broth or water to help it go down. Praise and reward your dog throughout.

    Talk to your vet at Chastain Veterinary Medical Group for more advice for providing the best care for your beloved pet. To schedule a consultation at our Animal Hospital in McKinney call (972) 529-5033, or for our Hospital in North Dallas, please call (972) 239-1309.

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