• Signs That Your Dog Needs Immediate Veterinary Care

    No dog family wants to think about their pup suffering a medical crisis, but these things do happen and knowing when to visit the emergency vet could save your pet’s life. If you notice these symptoms in your dog, go to the emergency vet clinic to get a fast diagnosis and urgent treatment for your pet.

    Change in Gum Color
    Your dog’s gums can tell you a lot about his or her health. Generally, your dog’s gums should look pink. When you press on the gums, they should temporarily turn white in the area in which you applied pressure and then quickly recolor to their pink state. Gums that are blue, gray, deep red or very pale can indicate an issue with oxygenation or that your dog could be hemorrhaging. If you notice this symptom, it’s best to seek emergency vet care as soon as possible.

    Abdominal Distention
    Abdominal distention is a potential indicator of one of the most serious emergencies dogs can face—gastric volvulus, also called bloat. With bloat, your dog’s stomach becomes overinflated and twisted, this creating a dangerous blockage. In addition to a distended abdomen, dogs who are suffering from bloat may also pant and become restless, struggling to find a comfortable position to lay down. They may also dry heave. If you notice any of these symptoms, seek immediate vet care for your pet.

    Exposure to Poison
    If you know your dog has been exposed to a poison, such as rodent bait or a toxic food, it’s important to get emergency vet care. Many items in your home can be potentially toxic to your pet, including medications, chocolate, raisins, and grapes, so be mindful about the access your dog could have to potentially harmful things.

    At Chastain Veterinary Medical Group, we know how scary it can be to see your pet have a medical emergency. We’re here to help you get the emergency vet care in Dallas you need, and we are also affiliated with emergency vet clinics across the area. To learn more about our vet services in the McKinney / Frisco area of Texas, please call (972) 529-5033, or to make an appointment at our north Dallas animal hospital, please call (972) 239-1309.

  • Build a Better First-Aid Kit for Small Pets

    veterinarian dallas

    First-aid kits aren’t just for the two-legged members of your family. Pets need their own kits, so you have everything on hand that you will need if your pet becomes injured. For serious injuries or illnesses, your pet should visit the emergency veterinarian right away, but the tools in your first-aid kit will help you take care of minor issues at home or provide some initial care so that you can safely get your pet to the animal hospital.

    For your small animals, like dogs and cats, your pet-friendly first-aid kit should include cloth and paper towels, 2-3 slip leashes, cotton swabs, cotton balls, and bandaging materials. You should also have lubricant, such as petroleum jelly, nail clippers, tweezers, and medications, including eye wash solution, probiotic gels, antibiotic ointments, and wound disinfectants. Keep your veterinarian’s number and the number for the poison control center in the kit as well.

    When your pet has a medical emergency, Chastain Veterinary Medical Group is available to help with emergency vet care in both Dallas and McKinney. Find out how to get urgent vet care for your pet by calling Preston Road Animal Hospital in Dallas at (972) 239-1309, or by calling Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in McKinney at (972) 529-5033.

  • Gut Stasis in Guinea Pigs: Take Immediate Action to Save Your Pets

    emergency vet dallas guinea pig

    Gut stasis—also called gastrointestinal stasis or GI stasis—is one of the most common medical emergencies that guinea pigs experience. If you think that your guinea pig could have gut stasis, visit an emergency veterinary clinic right away for treatment. Delayed care could be life-threatening to your pet. Here is what you need to know.

    What is gut stasis?

    Gut stasis occurs when the contractions in the GI tract slow down. For guinea pigs, even a small slowdown in GI activity can be dangerous. Generally, gut stasis occurs as the result of an unhealthy diet. Feeding guinea pigs pellet foods without an adequate amount of roughage or too many foods with high sugar or grain contents can also be dangerous. Talking to your veterinarian about a healthy diet can help to reduce the risk of gut stasis. Gut stasis will also occur if your guinea pig stops eating for some reason. Such a loss of appetite could occur because of dental problems, pain, or stress for example.

    What are the symptoms?

    Gut stasis can cause decreased or no appetite, decreased activity, lethargy, and weakness. Guinea pigs may also experience diarrhea or decreased fecal production, in which fecal pellets are small and dry. Guinea pigs that don’t eat or produce feces for 24 hours should be seen at an emergency veterinary clinic right away, as they could be experiencing gut stasis.

    How is gut stasis treated?

    If your veterinarian determines that gut stasis is causing your guinea pig’s symptoms, he or she will usually provide subcutaneous fluid replacement and medications to stimulate gut motility. Pain medications can also help your guinea pig feel more comfortable. Getting your pet to eat is paramount for his or her recovery. If your guinea pig refuses to eat greens and grass hay, he or she may be fed a specially formulated gruel by syringe.

    Don’t delay seeking emergency care at Chastain Veterinary Medical Group if you suspect that your guinea pig could be suffering from gut stasis. You can learn more about emergency pet care and our AAHA accredited animal hospitals in Dallas and McKinney by calling (972) 239-1309 for Preston Road Animal Hospital in Dallas or by calling (972) 529-5033 for Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in the McKinney/Frisco area.

  • Household Hazards for Small Pets

    animal hospital dallas

    Hazards lurk around the home for all pets, but there are some things that put small animals particularly at risk. What should you look for when you are safety-proofing your house for your small pet? Avoid a trip to the emergency vet clinic by keeping an eye out for these hazards.

    One major hazard for small pets is loose wires. They are frequently at just the right height for small animals, and chewing them can lead to burn injuries as well as poisoning from zinc and copper. When you drop a pill on the floor, your small pet can find it easily and is at risk of experiencing toxic effects. Larger animals and children are also potentially dangerous for small pets. Even friendly play with a larger animal or child can lead to devastating injuries to a small pet.

    If your pet does experience an urgent medical need, get emergency vet care from Chastain Veterinary Medical Group fast. Quick treatment could be lifesaving. To learn where to find one of our veterinary clinics in Dallas and McKinney, please call Preston Road Animal Hospital in north Dallas at (972) 239-1309 or by call Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in McKinney at (972) 529-5033.

  • Taking a Look at Our Life Guardianship Trust

    At Chastain Veterinary Medical Group, we are committed to helping our community help animals get the love and care they need. Our Life Guardianship Trust for pets is designed to meet this goal. Through the generous donations of our clients and other animal lovers in Dallas and McKinney, our veterinary hospital is able to provide much-needed care to animals in crisis.

    The money in the Life Guardianship Trust is used to provide veterinarian services to homeless pets and wildlife and to help families whose pets need critical care that they cannot afford. The fund is also used to improve the quality of care we provide to our clients. We invite pet lovers to contribute to the fund at any time.

    Finding out more about the Chastain Veterinary Medical Group and the services at our veterinary clinics in Dallas and McKinney is super easy. Simply call (972) 239-1309 for Preston Road Animal Hospital in Dallas or call (972) 529-5033 for Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in McKinney, for more information.

  • What a Bloated Abdomen Could Mean for Your Dog

    Dogs love their food, and when they overindulge, their stomachs may show the signs. However, abdominal distension in a dog can also be an indicator of an extremely serious medical condition called bloat. If your dog has a bloated abdomen, you may need to seek emergency veterinary treatment in case your pet needs urgent care. Here is a look at some of the most common causes of abdominal bloating in dogs.

    Bloating from Overeating

    If your dog has a bloated abdomen but he or she appears otherwise healthy and happy, then the bloating is likely to be caused by overindulging. One simple way to recognize this kind of bloating is to know that your dog has recently eaten more than usual. For instance, if your dog managed to grab some table scraps and is now full and content, the bloating may not be a cause for concern but rather a side effect of eating too much. Overeating can lead to the more serious form of bloat, however, so it is important to be vigilant about your dog’s symptoms.

    Bloat

    Bloat, also more technically called gastric dilation and volvulus (GDV), is one of the most serious emergencies dogs can face. Without treatment, GDV can be fatal within hours of the onset of symptoms. It occurs when a bloated stomach twists on itself, inside the dog’s abdomen, which traps air and gas in the stomach and prevents blood from reaching the stomach. This condition is painful, so in addition to a distended abdomen, your dog will appear restless and anxious and he or she may pace, drool, and try to vomit unsuccessfully. You may also notice pale gums, shortness of breath, and a rapid heart rate as the condition progresses. It is important to seek immediate veterinarian care if you even suspect that your dog has GDV.

    Other Bloating Causes

    Other conditions can cause bloating as well, including peritonitis, an infection that occurs when the stomach or intestines rupture, and Cushing’s syndrome, in which the body overproduces the hormone cortisol. Both conditions are serious and require immediate treatment at an animal hospital.

    Chastain Veterinary Medical Group offers emergency vet care & advice in the Dallas areas when your dog needs it the most. Find out how to get life-saving care around the clock by calling Preston Road Animal Hospital in Dallas at (972) 239-1309 or by calling Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in McKinney at (972) 529-5033.

  • Dealing with an Animal Medical Emergency

    A medical emergency is scary, but the truth is most pet families are bound to face at least one such crisis. When trouble strikes, seeing an emergency vet as soon as possible could be critical for your pet’s well-being.

    The best way to deal with an animal medical emergency is to know what you will do, who you will call, and where you will go, before an urgent need arises. Find out your veterinarian’s emergency care protocols and locate the nearest emergency vet to your home. Know how to contact your veterinarian in an Emergency – in our case the phone number for the Emergency Messaging System is (214) 439-7233. If an emergency does happen, act quickly but calmly. If you are anxious, your pet will be, too. At the emergency animal clinic, the staff will triage your pet’s case and ensure he or she gets the right care at the right time.

    Chastain Veterinary Medical Group offers emergency vet care in Dallas and the McKinney / Frisco areas during regular business hours and we share emergency care affiliations with several emergency-only animal clinics in the area. To speak to us about this or to schedule an appointment with one of our veterinarians, please phone Preston Road Animal Hospital in north Dallas at (972) 239-1309 or phone Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in the McKinney/Frisco area at (972) 529-5033.

  • What to Expect When Your Pet Needs Surgery

    Pet parents never want to think about their beloved animal undergoing surgery, but sometimes it is necessary to treat an illness or injury. At every turn, your veterinarian and the staff at the pet hospital will be available to explain the process for you and address your concerns. If your pet is scheduled for surgery, here is a look at what you can expect.

    Pre-Operative Prep

    Before your pet undergoes his or her procedure, your veterinarian will take every possible precaution before surgery to ensure that your pet is healthy enough for anesthesia and recovery. This will typically include a physical exam, blood work, and ECG screenings. These tests help your veterinarian make the right decisions about the type of anesthesia to use and which medications may be necessary before and after surgery. If the surgery is a planned procedure and not one that is the result of an emergency, be sure to follow all pre-op instructions and to bring your pet in for appointments and screenings as necessary to avoid delays in the surgery. For emergencies, these pre-op tests will be performed immediately before surgery.

    Surgical Procedure

    During surgery, your pet will receive the type of anesthetics that the veterinarian has determined are appropriate for him or her. The procedure itself will, of course, vary depending on the problem that is being treated. Your veterinarian will explain what the procedure will entail and how long you can expect your pet to be in surgery.

    Post-Operative Recovery

    After surgery, your pet will recover in a specialized area of the pet hospital while being closely monitored by veterinary nurses as he or she recovers from the anesthesia. He or she will also receive pain medication as needed. When it’s time for your pet to go home, you’ll receive medication and home care instructions. You may also make a time for a return visit for a checkup.

    Chastain Veterinary Medical Group understands how overwhelming pet surgery can be, and we strive to give every pet family the best possible experience. When your pet needs surgery, schedule a consultation with one of our veterinarians in Dallas or McKinney. Call Preston Road Animal Hospital in north Dallas at (972) 239-1309 or call Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in the McKinney/Frisco area at (972) 529-5033.

  • A Closer Look at Our Clinical Lab

    At Chastain Veterinary Medical Group, we understand the need for urgent answers when your pet is sick. That is why our animal clinic is pleased to offer a complete, in-house lab at each of our locations that can run screening and diagnostic tests. This lets us make fast decisions that are necessary for your animal’s care.

    Our in-house lab can run complete blood counts, biochemistry tests for organ function, electrolyte tests, and urinalysis, and results are available within minutes. This ability is essential for emergency veterinary care, so we can make an accurate diagnosis and begin treatment, which may be lifesaving, as soon as possible. Although we use an outside lab for routine tests, which is sometimes less expensive, our in-house lab is a crucial part of providing care for your pet.

    You can learn more about the lab services at our animal clinics in McKinney and Dallas by calling Chastain Veterinary Medical Group today. To schedule an appointment with one of our veterinarians, please phone Preston Road Animal Hospital in north Dallas at (972) 239-1309 or phone Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in the McKinney/Frisco area at (972) 529-5033.

  • Make Vet Trips Free of Fear

    Make Vet Trips Free of Fear

    If your pet dreads trips to the animal hospital, there are several things you can do to take the stress out of the experience. Watch this video to learn how to make trips to the veterinarian less fearful.

    Start by not feeding your pet after 6 p.m. the night before his or her appointment, unless your veterinarian tells you otherwise. This will make your pet more responsive to the treats her is offered at the pet hospital. Avoid baby talking to your pet as well. Although you are trying to comfort your pet, you could actually be making him or her more anxious.

    At Chastain Veterinary Medical Group, our patient team of animal lovers is dedicated to making every animal clinic visit as comfortable as possible. To make an appointment at any one of our animal hospitals in the Motorplex, please call (972) 239-1309 for Preston Road Animal Hospital in north Dallas or call (972) 529-5033 for Meadow Brook Animal Hospital in McKinney.

Recent Posts

Popular Posts

categories

Archives