Chastain Veterinary Medical Group
972.239.1309
Welcome to Chastain Veterinary Medical Group! For 20 years now we've been providing advanced veterinary care mixed with old-fashioned compassion for pets in the North Dallas area of Texas.

Spotting the Signs of Tummy Troubles in Your Dog

With the way most dogs eat anything they can get their hands on, it’s no surprise that they frequently experience stomach upset. Although tummy troubles may be relatively common in dogs, it’s a good idea to be able to spot the signs, so that you can take action to make your pup feel better and so that you know when to seek emergency vet care. Here are some indicators that your dog is experiencing tummy problems and what you can do to help.

Eating Grass
If you notice that your dog has taken to dining on grass, then he or she is likely to have an upset stomach. Dogs gravitate towards grass when they are feeling unwell. Eating grass tends to quell digestive problems, although some dogs may vomit after eating it. Occasionally, dogs eat grass for other reasons, such as boredom, but keep an eye out for other signs of stomach issues if you see your dog eating grass, and consult with your veterinarian if he or she is persistently eating it.

Vomiting
Vomiting is an obvious sign of stomach problems in dogs. In some cases, vomiting is not a reason for concern. However, if your dog has a sudden onset of severe vomiting, or if the vomit contains blood or looks like it has coffee grounds in it, seek emergency vet care. This kind of vomiting can indicate a serious underlying issue or that your dog has ingested something dangerous.

Disinterest in Activities
If your dog becomes disinterested in food and his or her usual activities, an upset tummy could be to blame. Just as people become tired and lethargic when they’re unwell, your dog will want to rest and withdrawal if he or she is feeling sick. If this symptom persists, call your veterinarian.

If your dog is feeling under the weather, let Chastain Veterinary Medical Group get him or her back to good health. Both of our animal hospitals are accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association. We offer sick pet care and emergency vet visits in Dallas, with in-house diagnostics to make sure your pup get the best and fastest care possible. To make an appointment at our McKinney/Frisco animal hospital, please call (972) 529-5033, or to make an appointment at our north Dallas animal hospital, please call (972) 239-1309.


Does Your Dog Really Understand You?

All dog families know that humans and their canine counterparts communicate extensively. However, while most people do speak to their dogs, the question remains: do their dogs really understand what they are saying? For instance, if you tell your dog that it is time to go to the veterinarian, will he or she really picture a trip to the animal clinic?

Watch this video for some insight into the communication that exists between humans and dogs. Dogs may not get the meaning of every word, but they are extremely resourceful when it comes to responding to nonverbal cues.

For all of your questions about your pup’s behavior and health needs, Chastain Veterinary Medical Group is here to help with preventive care, pet grooming, and much more. To make an appointment at our McKinney/Frisco animal hospital, please call (972) 529-5033, or to make an appointment at our north Dallas animal hospital, please call (972) 239-1309.


Answering Questions About Caring for Older Dogs

Your dog has given you years of love, and when he or she becomes older, your pup will need some special care in return. Dogs can live long, healthy, happy lives with age-appropriate care and treatments for any medical conditions that they develop. As your dog ages, your veterinarian may recommend more frequent checkups to identify any health problems that do develop in their earliest stages. Here are the answers to questions that dog families frequently have about keeping their beloved pooches happy and healthy during their golden years.

When is a dog considered to be old?

Aging varies depending on breed and size, with larger dogs usually aging faster than smaller ones. Small to medium dogs are usually considered to be seniors when they reach age seven. Large dogs are considered to be senior by age six. There is no accurate formula that determines a dog’s age in human years, but when dogs reach age six to seven, they have aged roughly as much as a human in his or her late 40s or early 50s.

What health problems are common in older pets?

The common health problems in older dogs are very similar to kinds of health problems that people experience as they age. They include:

  • Arthritis
  • Heart disease
  • Cancer
  • Kidney disease
  • Diabetes
  • Weakness
  • Senility

Your veterinarian can tell you about any breed-specific health risks that your dog may face that you should be vigilant about spotting.

How can I help my older dog stay healthy?

The best thing you can do for your aging dog is see the veterinarian regularly for preventive care and checkups. Health problems are easier to treat when they diagnosed in their early stages, and regular visits to the animal clinic make early diagnosis possible. Maintaining dog dental care as recommended by your vet is helpful, as is keeping your dog active and feeding him or her a healthy diet.

Chastain Veterinary Medical Group can help your dog stay healthy and happy throughout his or her senior years, thanks to our preventive care, on-site diagnostics, and our Life-Cycle Wellness Program. To make an appointment at our pet hospital in Dallas, please call (972) 239-1309. For the McKinney Office, please call (972) 529-5033.


Helping a Finicky Feline Fall in Love with Feeding Time

Dogs may have a reputation for eating anything that they can get, but cats are known for their stubbornness and finicky natures. Some cats love to eat, but if your cat is turning his or her nose up at the food on offer, don’t expect him or her to give in any time soon. Fortunately, there are things you can do to tempt him or her back to the food bowl. The first step is to check with your veterinarian to see if any underlying medical issues could be contributing to your cat’s decision to pass on food. If he or she gets a clean bill of health, these tips could make feeding time easier.

Give Your Cat a Quiet Place to Eat

In the wild, cats hunt alone, and they prefer to eat alone. If your cat’s food bowl is in a high-traffic part of the house, he or she may be feel too threatened to eat because of all of the background noise. Make sure your cat’s food bowl is in a location where he or she can eat without any anxiousness caused by the activity going on in the background. If you have multiple cats, each should have his or her own bowl and each bowl may need to be in a separate part of the house.

Consider Changing Foods

Both wet and dry foods can be healthy for cats, so consider changing your cat’s food if he or she is resistant to what you’re currently serving. Your veterinarian can help you select a nutritious cat food that is right for your pet. Initially, your cat may be hesitant to try the new food, but if it is a food that he or she will eat, you can expect him or her to dive in within a day or two.

Ease Up on the Treats

If your cat is a treat lover, he or she may simply be holding out for something better instead of eating his or her food. Feed fewer treats per day so that your cat starts to eat food. You may need to remove treats entirely until your cat starts eating.

From behavioral advice to cat teeth cleaning, Chastain Veterinary Medical Group provides comprehensive vet services to keep your cat healthy for life. Contact our AAHA-accredited pet hospitals by dialing (972) 529-5033 for the McKinney facility or by dialing (972)239-1309 for the Dallas facility.


Promote the Long-Term Health of Your Dog by Scheduling Annual Checkups

One of the most important things you can do for the health of your dog is to bring him or her to the veterinarian for regular checkups. During these preventive care appointments, your veterinarian can spot early signs of potential medical problems that could help your dog get treatment he or she needs to stay safe and healthy.

During an annual checkup, your vet will examine your dog’s coat and skin, check his or her weight, and evaluate his or her teeth for signs of tooth decay and gum disease. Your vet may also perform blood tests to look for indicators of medical problems and provide vaccinations that are right for your dog’s stage of life. These visits to the animal clinic are invaluable in helping pet families understand the best ways to care for their dogs so that they stay happy and healthy for life.

Whether you need a wellness exam for your dog, dog teeth cleaning, or dog boarding, Chastain Veterinary Medical Group can be your partner in protecting your pup’s good health. To make an appointment at our McKinney/Frisco animal hospital, please call (972) 529-5033, or to make an appointment at our north Dallas animal hospital, please call (972) 239-1309.


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Hours of Operation:

  • 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM Sunday
  • 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM Monday
  • 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM Tuesday
  • 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM Wednesday
  • 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM Thursday
  • 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM Friday
  • 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM Saturday